Blog
Blog
  • Making World Book Day Inclusive

    by Emma Bara Recently, I attended a meeting at my daughter’s school, which has a special unit for hearing impaired children. On the agenda was World Book Day and how it could be made more engaging than just having kids dress up in any old costume, which usually leads to a silly number of princesses …

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    calendarFebruary 20 2020

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  • Crohn’s, diagnosing my daughter.

    by Gail Crampton When my daughter, Isabelle, was 6 she began having severe stomach pains, nausea and no appetite. It would appear and disappear, but each time get progressively worse. We noticed that she was becoming very thin, lethargic and pale. I took her to her GP countless times, she had numerous blood tests and …

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    calendarFebruary 16 2020

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  • My experience of being tube fed, by Sam

    I was 7 yrs old when I had my first feeding tube, this was because my body couldn’t absorb all of the essential nutrients that I needed in my diet, and I was permanently ill with pain and I was always so tired. At 7yrs old I was fed up of the constant pain and …

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    calendarFebruary 12 2020

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  • Diagnosing Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes

    by Caroline Bailey Hi, my name is Caroline, I am 48 years old, married for 25 years and have 3 children, Samuel age 24, Robyn age 20 and Darcey age 15. I also have a stepdaughter age 37 and 2 step granddaughters! I have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), a rare and difficult disease to spot; I …

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    calendarFebruary 6 2020

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  • Discovering Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes

    by Caroline Bailey When I was a little girl I was a little quirky, I remember walking to school with my brother and my mum saying “if you stand on a crack you’ll marry a bat and a rat will come to your wedding” 😂😂 I became so scared of standing on the cracks it …

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    calendarFebruary 3 2020

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  • Inclusion Starts with a Smile

    by Autism Dad, Adam Murphy  I’m a 47 year old father of 3 boys. My eldest son has autistic spectrum disorder and learning disabilities. Autism is a word that everyone knows but very few people understand, even those that do understand can only understand their experience and how it directly effects them or their family. …

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    calendarJanuary 28 2020

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  • Autism and Accessibility

    by Adam Barrett, Access Social Ltd. Being an older brother I have always been very protective of my little sister. (there’s 4 years difference between the two of us) This protectiveness has definitely been increased to biblical proportions due to her disability. Look at her the wrong way, use inappropriate language in her presence, I’ll …

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    calendarJanuary 22 2020

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  • Helping your kids with social situations

    By Paul Rose, YouTeachMeToo. Have you ever found yourself in social situations that you were not sure how to handle? How did it make you feel? Awkward? Embarrassed? Confused? Angry? Frustrated? It can be hard to understand what other people really mean and expect from you, and it can be just as hard to get …

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    calendarJanuary 11 2020

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  • Reflections on the rewards of supporting refugee children and families

    by Lynne Awbery, teacher of the deaf. A lawyer from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a mother from Sudan, a teacher from former Yugoslavia, an architect from Somalia, a doctor from Eritrea, a teenager from Rwanda, a carpenter from Afghanistan, a trafficked mother from Ghana, a housewife, widow and mother from Sri Lanka….. and …

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    calendarJanuary 8 2020

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  • Because of Indee, we created a community.

    by Jane Allen, Indee Rose Trust In 2009 we sadly lost our beautiful daughter, Indee Rose, after a short illness diagnosed with a DIPG type brain tumour. At only 3 years of age, Indee showed us positivity, strength and her biggest gift was to show us how to stay happy and laugh her way throughout …

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    calendarDecember 30 2019

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  • Hospital Play Workers, more than just a bit of fun!

    by David Bara You might call them play workers, they are the people who you’ll find doing fun things in the hospital play rooms or who come and visit you by your hospital bed with armfuls of stickers, but did you know their proper title is likely to be Health Play Specialists (in the UK) …

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    calendarDecember 21 2019

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  • Making changes as a parent by Keighley Miles

    Recently I found out that our local hospital has a CHSWG group (Children hearing services working together) and after attending some working in partnership training with National Deaf Children’s Society (NDCS) I decided to volunteer to become a parent representative. This means at the meeting I can put the parents’ views across and make the …

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    calendarDecember 18 2019

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  • Choosing a school for your SEN child by Kate O’Riordan

    Finding the right school place for your child is one of the most important, stressful and challenging decisions you will ever have to make, whether your child has needs or not.  I have three children all at different schools, and I work in a fourth, that is a lot of INSET days to juggle!  The …

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    calendarDecember 14 2019

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  • From Cancer to SEND – a bumpy journey of acceptance.

    It can be hard to transition from being a cancer family to a special educational needs and disability family. This is one family's story.

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    calendarNovember 30 2019

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  • Social Situations – teach your child how you want them to react.

    by Paul Rose of YouTeachMeToo There comes a time when you have to decide: accept the status quo or take positive action. For 12 years I worked in UK schools, including a few years as a headteacher. Despite running a ‘successful’ school, I decided I could no longer watch young people being failed. So I …

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    calendarNovember 27 2019

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  • Visiting the doctor or hospital shouldn’t be that difficult – a few simple changes can make all the difference

     By David Bara MEd PGCE BA(HONS) and UN SDG 3 champion. A visit to the doctor or hospital can be challenging if you are relatively healthy but if you are taking a child or adult with additional needs, have access issues yourself, need to juggle multiple appointments or to plan your transport, etc. it can …

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    calendarNovember 24 2019

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  • Celebrating autism and neurodiversity!

    For us, there’s so much to celebrate and so much happiness that comes from being around autism and neurodiversity. Richard Nurse, founder of the digital visual timeline app, picturepath, recently asked through Quora ‘why it’s so hard to find the positives in autism?’ Here are some of the great answers he received… “I think it …

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    calendarNovember 21 2019

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  • What I wish I’d know when I was teaching by David Bara

    When I was a special needs teacher, I thought I knew lots. I was enthusiastic, I went on courses, listened, talked and did a master’s degree in Education. Along the way I had two children (well I didn’t, my wife Emma did). At school, I tried to advise and support the parents of kids with …

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    calendarNovember 14 2019

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  • I am my mum’s carer by Alfie, aged 6.

    My name is Alfie and I am 6 years old. When God made my Mummy he forgot to give her one of the bones in her back and taught the soldiers in her body to fight the good things in her body instead of the bad things in her body. This means that she is …

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    calendarNovember 9 2019

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  • Relationships—the key to an inclusive education by Elizabeth Wright.

    The moment that I was born my parents had to think about my education. They had to consider a multitude of aspects— what type of education they wanted for me, how to get the best education for me, and which school would be the best school to send me to. There was an urgency to …

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    calendarOctober 13 2019

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  • We Can Access, where did it all start?

    When did the magic moment for We Can Access come to my wife, Emma, and I? We were driving back from a family holiday in France, in early August in 2018. Our daughter is a brain tumour survivor with multiple access issues, she was 8 ½ at the time. Her older brother was and is …

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    calendarSeptember 26 2019

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